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Posts Tagged ‘strawberry shortcake’

I’ve been eating strawberries close to three meals a day for the past week. This time of year we must, and must not apologize, because winter is long, my friends. Often enough it’s berries in a bowl with plain yogurt, but I also made two recipes to take me through breakfast with aplomb.

The top is a Martha recipe, originally written to accompany late-season summer fruits (which it does very well), but it sure doesn’t hurt with June’s best, either. This is a nubbly, buttery, tender pound cake that calls for semolina flour, ground almonds, and my favorite spice, cardamom. I didn’t slice the berries because I’m a heathen, but you could. Someday I’ll try the cake toasted with butter, but for now, it’s been soaking up berries and some of that plain yogurt, making it lovely and pink and damp.

Then there’s my never-miss, never fail traditional strawberry shortcake. The recipe is from my 1968 Time-Life cookbook, American Cooking. It’s the author’s grandmother’s, and she used to make it with woodland strawberries that grew in the brambles on her farm in upstate New York. I try not to think about how deliriously good it would be with wild strawberries and just take what I have, which is fine enough indeed. (Though I can’t lie: when I someday get my hands on woodland strawberries, their fate is sealed with this recipe.)

Take a hot, fresh, homemade buttermilk biscuit. Split it with two forks, butter the fluffy insides, close it back up, set it in a bowl, and top with sugared strawberries and cold fresh cream. Sweet fancy Moses, but that’s a good breakfast.

Okay, the below isn’t a strawberry recipe or any recipe for that matter, but I thought you’d dig it. In fact, disclaimer: all but the very top pastry (a chocolate-covered cream puff) are pretend. I made this tray last week for a production of ‘The Drowsy Chaperone,’ carried by the goofbally Gangster Bakers. They say stuff like ‘You biscotti be kidding me,’ ‘You’re really in truffle!’ and ‘One cannoli hope.’ I could go on, but I don’t want to lose readers. There are fortune cookies, too, containing theatre platitudes I made up like ‘Cold free pizza is still pizza.’

Made of craft foam, white Model Magic, homemade play dough, glue, gel paste, paper, and paint. I guess technically that’s a recipe. Got a bang out of making this, and there’s muffin you can do about it. 🙂

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A fatty!

Very, very few things give me as much pleasure as picking the first strawberries of the season. And after a number of years of picking after it had rained the night before (which was gross) and going at noon in the heat (only to plotz), I’ve worked out a practical system.

1) Per my first lesson above, choose a day after a sunny day to go. Mud is a bit of a bummer.

2) Wear jeans, an old t shirt, boots, a hat, and sunblock. Tuck your pant legs into your socks to ward off ticks. Bring a water bottle and more sunblock for the ride home.

3) Go to the farm first thing in the morning when it opens. If there’s still mist floating by, you’re on time. This guarantees the coolest weather of the day as well scarcity of crowds. Besides the farm staff, you’ll probably be the only one there.

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In repose. And about to be macerated in sugar. Don’t breathe a word.

4) While we’re on the topic, introduce yourself and remember to be respectful of everyone who works there. Barring Red Cross relief workers in Uganda, few people work as hard, amid as much uncertainty, while maintaining optimism, as a farmer. And besides that, they feed us.

5) Take a flat out to the fields instead of a basket if you can. Laying the berries in one layer means they won’t get crushed.

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Sliced and lightly sugared for the freezer.

6) Sit your sweet self right down onto the straw path between the rows of strawberries, which is dry because it didn’t rain last night, and pick and scootch along as needed. Sounds nutty, I know, but the benefit of sitting is twofold: it saves your back and quads from pain tomorrow, and you’ll see berries you would have otherwise missed standing and bending.

I’ve written before about taking the time to look beneath, and how much you can reap in doing so. It’s true whether you’re looking for berries or a loyal friend or pretty much anything of value. You need to look, to be deliberate. You need to have your eyes open and reach where others won’t.

You won’t always find something. But you usually will—that I can promise. You’ll get to the counter to pay for your berries and people will flip out. ‘How did you find so many? I was just out there and I only got a pint!’ Just smile enigmatically and whisper, ‘Look beneath.’

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Buttermilk biscuits pipin’ hot.

7) Choose berries that are evenly red, with as few white ‘shoulders’—that’s the top of the berry, by the stem—as possible. Get the darkest red berries you can find for deepest flavor, and eat those up first, since they’re the ripest. Get shiny red ones for firmness and bright flavor; they’ll be the ones that stand up in your showboat recipes like decorative tarts.

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They got creamed.

8) Eat a warm fat one right off the plant. There are many glories gone to us, never to return. This remains. Enjoy it.

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The best thing you can do with a heap of strawberries. Classic Americana: the strawberry shortcake.

 

 

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This is a Buddha burger, from the very popular and much missed ‘grease trucks’ at Rutgers University. It’s a cheeseburger with pork roll, french fries, mayonnaise, and a bunch of other things I’m better off not remembering. I wouldn’t have done this until recently. Then I did, and life was so much prettier.

In one of my very favorite scenes in the new incarnation of the Doctor Who series, little Amelia Pond finds the ravenous Doctor in her backyard and tries to offer him something that will satisfy his hunger. Matt Smith’s charmingly loopy Doctor says he loves apples; she gives him one, he takes a huge bite and then spits it out, calling it disgusting. Same goes for beans, yogurt, bacon…(this goes on). Then he tries fish fingers dipped in custard and they have a winner. Obviously, I mean, who wouldn’t go for that?

Amelia doesn’t understand why he is changing his mind so much. But the well-versed* Doctor Who viewer does: the Doctor regenerates from time to time, and when he does, he is a spinning roulette wheel; every characteristic—physical, emotional, everything—is in flux. When he’s in this state, his food preferences are like that of others in flux—a pregnant woman, or a child, for example. ‘New mouth, new rules,’ he says.

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Asparagus, which I never liked until maybe 10 years ago. Roasted or bust!

I wasn’t ridiculously finicky as a kid—I know kids who will eat nothing but processed cheese slices and frozen waffles—but I decided to abhor certain things and stuck to it. My dad once handed me a morsel of something fried, said, ‘It’s a french fry,’  and watched. That was the tell: if it had in fact been a french fry, he wouldn’t be watching for my reaction. He knew I liked french fries. I handed it back to him. Turns out it was calamari.

No. No way. Not when I was eight.

Another time I asked if whatever he was making had mushrooms in it. He said it did but, ‘You can’t even taste them!’ My reply: ‘Then why did you put them in?’ This is a tough question to answer if you want to hang on to your original statement.

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Pizza with ricotta, caramelized onions and figs. The second two were no-go’s as a kid.

Environment also plays a factor. We all know kids who wouldn’t even sit at the same table as pasta fra diavolo at home, but if somewhere else, will gobble it blissfully.

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Pasta made with the black ink of a squid and fresh garlic. A horror, both, until maybe five years ago.

But more interesting to me than environment is how time and experience alter our food preferences. We’ll pick the raisins out of everything we see at 11, but at 31 we’ll double them in our cookie recipe.

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Sandwich with tuna and anchovy. First fish, fine. Second, forget it—until I was in my twenties. Now I think almost anything can benefit from anchovy except maybe strawberry shortcake.

For all of the foods I didn’t like as a kid, there are a few I liked then that I’m not crazy over now. Milk chocolate is one. Unless it’s great quality—smooth, not gritty tasting like Hershey’s—I stick to dark. And I hated dark as a kid.

In my wild, misspent youth I also ate chem lab projects like Pixie Stix and those freaky little candies attached to long strips of paper. Do you remember those? The paper stayed attached to the backs after you ripped them off the roll. Fiber and artificial flavors—quelle deal!

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Horseradish, another no-man’s land until maybe my 30s. Fresh grated and kept in vinegar, it’s surprisingly sweet and works in dozens of ways.

My food tastes changed toward the spicy after I had an ulcer. Wrote about it. That esophogeal burden prohibited me from eating citrus, chocolate, and more, but especially from eating anything with so much as a fleck of caliente. When the ulcer was gone, I hit the hot pepper full force—much more than I did before the ulcer.

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The sausage sandwich, that favorite of my Italian family, and its spiciness made it out of the question for me until I was well into adulthood.

New mouth, new rules.

How have your food tastes changed? What did you used to scorn but now love, and the other way around?

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Mushrooms plain grossed me out as a kid. I didn’t eat them until I was in my mid-twenties, when my friend ordered them on a pizza and I was too hungry to pull them off. Now I can’t get enough of any variety.

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When I was a kid, tomatoes always tasted like sodden gym socks to me. I suspect many still do. Then I tried heirlooms. Home run.

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The only nut I’d eat as a kid was peanut butter. Not peanuts, mind you—but peanut butter. Now I love them all. This is a cupcake with my homemade gianduja (Nutella) in the batter and on top.

*Euphemism. Obsessed is closer to accurate.

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this is a great time of year for cooks and appreciative eaters, late spring. a few teasing scallions, the first strawberries. you can feel the swell in the warming air. we’re on the verge of everything.

winter’s nice with its slow-cooked stews and cindy lou who roast beast. I even have a fruitcake recipe that doesn’t inspire comparisons to an anvil. but when I shed the winter sweaters and heavy socks, I want to shed the winter kitchen and heavy food, too.

bring on lemon anything, pale green anything. I don’t even want to cook it if I don’t have to. tonight for dinner I ate vanilla yogurt and raw, local, organic sugar snap peas that I washed and sprinkled with kosher salt. cold-weather food soothes; warm-weather food enlivens. you feel lighter and refreshed, ready to get back outside.

last week I spoke with the chef of tre amici in long branch, nj, a young guy who’s always itching to do something fresh and different. consequently, he either goes out of his way to get beautiful produce or he simply grows it himself. when fall comes, his climbing concord grape vine and little black mission fig tree will be loaded with fruit that he can use with roast game, desserts, whatever. talk about anticipation.

A still-green fig, waiting for its moment in the sun.

there is so much to look forward to. let’s get our feet wet with the best the season has now. like strawberries. the best way I can think of to enjoy them is in an old, old recipe, from a long-gone farmer’s wife, for strawberry shortcake. it’s not a vanilla layer cake with whipped cream and chilean strawberries that you get at perkins. it might have its own redeeming qualities, but it is not strawberry shortcake. this is.

wash, then hull, a big bunch of strawberries. please get them from a farmers’ market if you want them to have any flavor at all. get little ones, because as with most produce, bigger means the flavor is diluted with too much water. smaller is sweeter. dump them in a big bowl, add some granulated sugar, and mash them up with a potato masher or a fork. put the bowl in the fridge.

next, make some biscuits. hit your standard cookbook or google for a recipe. finding one will not be a problem. (note: the kind from the freezer section will taste of the chemicals they contain, and do you really want to insult your strawberries? have a heart. a biscuit batch takes ten minutes to mix up, and you probably have all of the ingredients in the house right now. no joke.) make sure the biscuit is hot out of the oven or, if you baked it earlier, that it’s thoroughly reheated through.

split that guy open and butter lavishly. close it back up and set it in the bottom of a bowl. plop a pile of your sugared macerated strawberries on top of it. now pour heavy cream on top of everything, and oh man, if you’re lucky enough to live near a farm that produces its own cream, use that. just don’t tell me about it or I’ll cry with envy. now grab a spoon and get down to it.

later you can dream about what else is to come. for now…this strawberry dream is as good as any.

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