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Posts Tagged ‘lemon cake’

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I’m on a lemon kick, I suppose. Did you ever have a craving just clobber you upside the head? This morning I happened upon a Nigella recipe for lemon yogurt cake and that was it: I got dressed, drove to the store, and bought a lemon.

This should have been a simple cake to make—there are few ingredients, they’re all recognizable, etc.–but it wasn’t written well. The measurements she gives are fine, but the process was frustrating; she kept instructing us to use a pot of this and a pot of that instead of the very measurements she calls for above. Grateful that I’ve spent most of my life in the kitchen and knowing I could grope my way out of this, I just stopped for a second, decided this was a basic cake—wet stuff added to dry stuff, combine and bake—and ignored everything in the middle of the recipe.

While stirring this up it occurred to me that I rarely go by the letter when I cook. Instead, I edit before I start. No, this doesn’t need two cups of sugar; good Lord almighty, one teaspoon is not going to be enough for something entitled a vanilla cake. And so on. I don’t do vegetable oil, so I substituted olive oil for this cake, and it was successful. Butter would have been good, too, obviously. And it called for the zest of half a lemon, but I know myself, and I like lemon desserts to taste quite powerfully of lemon. Delicately lemony cake, cookies, bars—not for me. So I zested the whole fruit.

Took a little bite when it was cool, and the inside is lovely and tender, almost creamy, like a really good pound cake. But even that whole lemon’s zest wasn’t enough for me. I’ll add the juice to the batter next time. Maybe I’ll end up squeezing it over the whole thing tomorrow like a filet of Dover sole.

One more thing: Nigella calls for the cake to go in a tube pan, but the only one I have is a Bundt. The cake’s a tad short in stature, as you can see. I’m going to try to eat it all before I learn if it has a Napoleonic complex.

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I once read a succinct account of what jam-making comes down to: ‘Take a bunch of fruit and sugar and boil the hell of it.’  Which is about as accurate as it gets. Although I haven’t yet gotten up the stones to make jam and then to can it because I’m chicken of getting whatever it is you can get if you do it wrong, I have figured out a way around this.

1) Make the jam, put it in a big Tupperware container, and put it in the freezer with a piece of parchment right on top of the fruit so it doesn’t get freezer-burny.

2) Make the jam, put it in a big Tupperware container, put it in the fridge, and eat it unabashedly every day for a week until it’s gone.*

I’ve done jam both ways, but for the following recipe, I typically do the latter.

Rhubarb, once called pieplant, is actually a vegetable, but it pairs so well with fruit that we give it a pass and treat it as such. It’s usually baked with strawberries—an admirable combination, if somewhat trite. Making marmalade out of rhubarb and citrus is a fresh way to enjoy it. And yet…this is a recipe from the turn of the last century. Everything old is new again, the early bird gets the worm, haste makes waste, etc.

I think you’ll dig it.

2 lbs. roughly chopped rhubarb (without the green leafy tops, which would give you a stomachache)

Juice of 1 orange

Juice of 1 lemon

2 cups granulated sugar**

2 oranges peeled, seeded and sectioned

Zest of 1 orange

1 lemon peeled, seeded and sectioned

Zest of 1 lemon

Put your rhubarb and juices into a deep pot.*** Bring to a boil, cover, and go check your email for about 15 minutes or until the rhubarb softens. Stir in your sugar, bring the heat back up, and boil, stirring for 5 minutes. Take the pot off the heat, stir in your citrus, and give it an occasional stir until it cools. That’s it.

This marmalade would work well on toast, or stirred into steel-cut Irish oatmeal, or drizzled warm over vanilla ice cream, or layered with yogurt. It would be killer layered between lemon cake or pound cake. It would glimmer with the collective light of the Milky Way galaxy in a Pavlova, that Australian favorite made of meringue and whipped cream. Or you could be boring like me and eat it right out of the Tupperware with whatever spoon’s clean.

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*Oh, also? Stock up on Imodium first.

**For a marmalade that’s more like, well, marmalade—that is to say, stiffer—add more sugar. The sweetness you get from 2 cups of sugar works for me, so my goo ends up with more of an applesaucy consistency.

***My pot above is enamelware and was bought at a horse farm near me, out of a barn that smelled of wood stove smoke. The splatters are from a chicken I roasted once and which insisted on leaving a bit of a grim legacy.

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